Nowhere Left to Eat, Polar Bears on the Brink

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Nowhere Left to Eat, Polar Bears on the Brink

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As a result of habitat change 52 polar bears were caught “invading” a Russian town to eat garbage to prevent starving to death as well said in Brandon Specktor’s article in Live Science. To sum that article up, the only way to fix their habitat is to change our CO2 levels.
“Amstrup’s own 2010 study project that continued decline in sea ice would reduce the global population of polar bears by two thirds, to a lot less than 10,000 by 2050.
Polar bears are considered endangered in the U.S. and are listed as “Vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, because their sea ice habitat is at threat due to climate change.”
The Arctic is rapidly changing. It’s always been a land of extreme weather, daylight, terrain. In a crucial development, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released its draft plan to conserve polar bears, calling for timely and decisive reduction of greenhouse gas emission levels to curb climate change.Trinity Swain a sophomore at Sedro-Woolley High School said that she would help climate change by using less oil.
Polar bears use sea ice as a platform for hunting seals, the bears’ primary prey, and when sea ice disappears in the summer, the bears must retreat to land away from those hunting areas. This winter has been extremely warm, and that is reflected in the very low sea ice cover that generally grows to its maximum around this time of year. NASA has been collecting data on Arctic sea-ice extent since the late 1970s. Last year’s maximum was the fourth-lowest on record, and 2016s sea ice extent is also among the lowest that scientists have seen in about 40 years.
Ice-free periods that last longer than four months will likely cause declines in polar bear populations. Those hungry bears will look for food wherever they can, including the towns and villages of the Arctic.
A polar bear’s keen sense of smell will lead it to garbage dumps, stored meat, and sometimes even sled dogs. These visits will usually end badly for polar bears. “Its upsetting.”, said Collin Wages, a sophomore from Stanwood High-School.