Shortage In Funds For Planned Parenthood

Iza Bowen-LeBlanc

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In recent news, the Trump Administration posted a final rule that would require family planning clinics to be housed in separate buildings from abortion clinics, a move that would cut off Planned Parenthood from some federal funding.
The rule, which was set to go into effect May 3, concerns a $286 million-a-year grant, known as Title X, that pays for birth control, testing of sexually transmitted diseases, and cancer screenings for 4 million low-income people. It requires the “physical and financial” separation of family planning services and abortion, and does not allow doctors to directly refer patients for abortions.
A Sedro-Woolley High School senior, Llyra Roe, is a Planned Parenthood Peer Educator and Volunteer. Roe has a strong opinion on Title X.
“I do not agree at all. I may be biased, as a Planned Parenthood volunteer, but Planned Parenthood provides SO much more than abortion services. Out of all the services Planned Parenthood provides, less than three percent of those are abortion services. There are so many stories out there of how Planned Parenthood saved lives or helped people in incredible ways. The United States can either have safe and legal abortions, or unsafe and illegal abortions with horribly high mortality rates,” said Roe, “Take your pick, Mr. Trump.”
A Sedro-Woolley High School alumni and Library/Technology Paraeducator, Kristen Schorno, can’t recall much about how Planned Parenthood affected her and her classmates while she attended high school from 2008 to 2012.
“I do not think that Planned Parenthood affected any of my classmates while I was in high school – I am sure that many girls without insurance went there to use their services,” Schorno answered, “with the world evolving and being more efficient I am sure that their servers are way better in this day in time.”
By separation abortion centers form the rest of the facility, some worry whether or not patients will face more targeted backlash when showing up for an appointment.
Shannon Moore, the Sedro-Woolley High School “Possibly. I also think it probably doesn’t matter where a clinic is located, there will always be protesters and hate towards others.”

Courtesy of Wikipedia Commons
Supporters of planned parenthood gather together to make a difference.